The Chive Keyhole Customer Success Story for growing businesses Keyhole Social Media Analytics

How theCHIVE Uses Unique Hashtags to Engage a Massive Follower Base

10 years ago, Co-Founders John and Leo Resig began a Men’s Lifestyle digital platform you may be familiar with: theCHIVE.

“They created a culture where people can escape from politics and the annoyance of everyday life and come and have a good laugh.”

-Jill Broek, Director of Brand Strategy

As you scan through the platform, you’ll find three types of posts: feel-good, funny images, pictures of women that the platform calls ‘Chivettes’, and stories from the CHIVE’s charity division.

Director of Brand Strategy, Jill Broek, shares with us that although some people may see theCHIVE as a “bro site”, this is actually just a misconception. From a woman’s perspective, the company culture is very inclusive of women and has a strong humanitarian focus.

“I think that from an outside perspective if people don’t know theCHIVE, it seems like this bro-centric culture but it’s really not. There are Chivettes on our site, and most of those images are submits from women across the country who want to be on the site. There are tons of women who visit the site on a regular basis themselves, and a ton of women that work here. It’s humor-first, and then humanity as well and trying to help the community.”

Helping the Community

TheCHIVE’s charity group helps the community by finding people in need and inspiring their massive platform, which has over 20 million monthly users, to take action.

They focus on people with rare medical diseases (for example, those that affect 0.04% of the world’s population), veterans, special education initiatives and first responders.

Through these efforts, theCHIVE has raised over 10 Million dollars for these various causes around the world in the past 10 years.

“Our audience is very motivated when there is a charity tie-in. We’ll usually ask our audience to share a post with a hashtag, and donate $1 per post to the affiliated charity.”

Unique Hashtags

But engaging such a wide-spread following can be challenging. How do you keep track of 20 million people a month and monitor how they’re engaging with your content?

TheCHIVE’s solution is using unique hashtags.

They’ve done this with multiple campaigns, like when they partnered with Netflix to promote The Punisher by asking their community to share a photo of the show’s famous skull design with #ThePunisher in their post.

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“The show was about a former military person, and those Punisher skulls are so prevalent within our community. So we asked them to post a photo with the skull and #ThePunisher and we donated $1 to CHIVEcharities to help veteran initiatives”

They ran a similar campaign to promote the new Dave Chappelle show, this time donating to DC public schools, which is Chappelle’s big charity initiative.

“Without Keyhole we wouldn’t have been able to do these campaigns.”

Unique Hashtags and a National Beer Pong Tournament

They also use unique hashtags to run other CHIVE-wide events, like the first-ever national beer pong tournament.

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“We started our partnership with you guys because we did our first ever national beer pong tournament. A client of ours was working with us to advertise their hangover relief product (FAST). The campaign was around March Madness, so we ran a bracket-style beer pong tournament.”

As the company couldn’t run full tournaments in every state, they used 50 unique hashtags (1 per state) to track the state-wide CHIVE beer pong tournaments being held around the U.S. The top 2 winners from each group were then flown into Austin for a National championship match.

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“We were tracking 50 different hashtags & figuring out who’s in the lead at each state in real-time. We would update it throughout the week to know who’s most likely to win. Without Keyhole, tracking this many hashtags would’ve been impossible, so that’s where our partnership started.”

So if you need to engage a massive community, keep unique hashtags in mind to anchor their conversations to each other and to you. Plus, running hashtag analytics on owned #s always provides an amazing opportunity for consumer insights.

Attention: These Keyword Research Tips can Skyrocket Your Website Conversions

Website getting traffic but still not getting conversions?

If you think your content’s fine, then perhaps you need to take a look at your keyword strategy?

Yes, you sometimes need to go all the way back to make sure you’re drawing in quality leads from the right channels.

It doesn’t matter if you’ve got the most brilliant and engaging pieces of content in the world. If you targeted the wrong keywords, none of your PPC, SEO, or content marketing strategies will consistently produce profitable results.

The good news is, keyword research doesn’t necessarily have to be extremely difficult. With the right tools and tactics, you can definitely discover lucrative keyword opportunities without breaking a sweat.

In this post, we’ll show you the best ways to do keyword research so you can bag winning keyword suggestions every single time.

Let’s get started.

1. Turn Seed Keywords Into Long-Tail Keywords

Regardless of niche, keyword research always starts with a seed keyword that’s too broad and competitive to be feasible.

That’s why you need tools like Ubersuggest to expand your seed keyword into hundreds of long-tail keyword ideas. These are keywords that are at least 3 terms long and target a narrower audience.

To use Ubersuggest, simply enter your seed keyword and click “Look Up.” Don’t forget to adjust the localization of your keyword to generate suggestions that are relevant to your place of business.

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Within seconds, Ubersuggest will generate hundreds of long-tail keywords as well as present the metrics that can determine their profitability.

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To keep things short, here is a brief explanation of each of the three metrics you’ll encounter in Ubersuggest results:

Search Volume
The first metric measures the average monthly searches. This can be directly used to gauge a keyword’s popularity and demand.

CPC
Short for cost per click, the CPC metric denotes the average amount that advertisers are willing to pay for PPC advertisement actions. A high CPC often signals that a particular keyword can be monetized and converts well.

Competition
Lastly, Ubersuggest measures the competitiveness level of keywords on a scale of 0.0 to 1.0. For faster results, it’s recommended that you target keywords with a competitiveness score of around 0.4 or less.

At this point, you should be able to come up with a fresh lineup of long-tail keywords (whether for PPC or SEO) based on the initial results.

But don’t get overexcited — there’s still much work to be done to make sure your keywords lead to conversions.

2. Pluck Out Commercial or Transactional Keywords

A rule of thumb when doing keyword research is to find the balance between search volume and competitiveness.

Of course, you don’t want to target keywords with barely any demand at all. You shouldn’t go with the flow and pick up a keyword that everyone else uses, either.

What you want are long-tail keywords that pertain to a user’s desire to take action.

You can do this by injecting commercial or transactional terms into your Ubersuggest keyword suggestions. Just enter terms like “buy,” “price,” “service,” “shop,” or whatever term makes sense for your seed keyword in the “Filter Results” field.

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After applying your filters, Ubersuggest will then refine and drastically reduce the number of keyword suggestions. This makes it much easier for you to spot profitable keyword opportunities:

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3. Track Trending Keywords on Social Media

If you’re trying to build traffic through social media, then you’ll need a slightly different approach when doing keyword research.

The main issue is that social media networks use internal search engines that don’t use the same keywords as web platforms like Google. As such, you need to use a keyword tracking tool that’s specifically tailored to social media networks.

Keyhole is, without a doubt, an excellent tool for this job. It allows you to find and monitor trending keywords as well as hashtags on Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, and Instagram — two of the biggest social media networks in terms of user engagement.

Just like Ubersuggest, you can start using Keyhole by entering a seed keyword. This time, however, you need to specify if you want to track a hashtag, keyword, URL, social media account, or brand mention.

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To fine-tune your keyword tracker, click “Advanced” to reveal the filters you can use to refine results. For example, if you want to ignore posts from a direct competitor, click on “Ignore posts” and fill in the rest of the details.

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Let’s say you want to track the keywords “WordPress,” “web design,” and “blogging.”

After the initial data is produced, you should be able to see pertinent information, such as the number of posts with your keywords, their collective reach, and even the overall sentiment of users.

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Before you save your tracker, don’t forget to specify how you want to receive alerts. This will enable you to be always in tune with social media users when it comes to your target keywords.

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Remember that tracking keywords on social media can improve conversions in two ways.

Apart from letting you gauge the demand for a keyword, it will also give you opportunities to initiate and close conversions yourself whenever your brand or product gets mentioned. For this, simply, track your brand name or social media handles via Keyhole.

4. Get Suggestions from the Keyword Cloud

Once your Keyhole tracker is up and running, it’s time to snag yourself some keyword ideas.

From the main dashboard, navigate to “My Trackers” and select the tracker you want to work with.

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This will pull up real-time data based on the tracking options you’ve set earlier.

Now, to locate new keyword opportunities, scroll down to the “Related Topics” section to view the hashtag and keyword clouds. Here, you can visually observe the popularity of keywords that are related to your seed keyword:

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How can social media keywords boost your conversions?

Good question.

Remember that most if not all online users only transact with brands they trust.

By participating in conversations and offering your expertise to social media users, you slowly build your brand’s authority in your niche. Of course, researching hashtags will also allow you to extend the social reach of your content whenever you share something.

To learn more how to leverage social media networks to win your audience’s trust, you can refer to more guides here.

Conclusion

Keyword research is a fundamental piece of online marketing that marketers love to overlook.

Hopefully, the guide above put keyword research in a new light. It’s not necessarily the most difficult aspect of online marketing, but it can have the biggest impact when it comes to the visibility of overall profitability of your website.

Do you have other suggestions on how marketers should perform keyword research? Feel free to share your thoughts in the comments below!

Jelly Keyhole Customer Success Story Social Media Analytics X-Ray

How to X-Ray Social Media, According to Manu from Jelly

Jelly is a cutting-edge Digital Agency based in Santiago, Chile.

They distinguish themselves with an almost exclusively digital focus, being “99.9% digital”, and flaunting big-deal clients like Toyota, Lenovo, and Mallplaza among others.

“Digital rules. If you focus on digital in the next 3-5 years you should be able to make it. That’s why digital is our core.”

Manu-Chatlani-1
Manu Chatlani
Executive Director

But with the exceptional amount of digital content out there today, Jelly’s challenge is to consistently deliver groundbreaking campaigns that stand out from the noise.

This is how they do it:

First, by promoting “rested brains” for their employees. This includes 5-week vacations for everyone on the team and working from home every Friday (because, as Manu told us, “ideas are not tied to a desk”).

The second step is putting the rested brains to work, milking every second of at-work time to make sure that any campaign they put out on social is being seen and well-received by any of the 3.03 billion social media users who may see it.

But, as you can imagine, managing these many impressions is not easy.

“Have you ever seen Guardians of the Galaxy from Marvel? It’s like you are in that spaceship. You are traveling, you know where you’re heading and you have no one ahead of you.

Then, suddenly, you have 20 enemy ships and you need to make a decision. Do you shoot, run, hide? My job is a lot like that. I am always making decisions on how to handle situations that come up. It’s non-stop.”

via GIPHY

Luckily, Keyhole makes analyzing social media much easier ?.

“Keyhole gives you a simplified view of what’s happening with a current issue: it could be a hashtag, a trend, it could be an account. Whatever it is, you can go in and get a quick snapshot of what’s happening.”

For example, Jelly recently launched an awareness campaign that resulted in over 23 million impressions on social in 90 days. These numbers are almost impossible to track manually.

Image showing top metrics from Keyhole's hashtag tracking dashboard for this campaign: 3,838 Posts, 1,544 Users, 126,637 engagements, 4,520,786 Reach, 23,317,928 Impressions

Using Keyhole, Manu’s team (as well as their client) was able to instantly see this kind of key information about their campaign’s performance both as it happened in real-time and at review stages once the campaign was done.

By analyzing all social media interactions and displaying the data in a simple way that takes out the guesswork, Keyhole helps Manu’s team to focus on what’s important. This way, brains don’t get over-tired with the nitty-gritty numbers, but simply use the data to make the best decisions possible.

This is why Manu sees Keyhole as a kind of social media X-ray. You can quickly get to the bottom line that you’re looking for without having to do extra digging.

“It’s like an X-ray at an emergency room. Even if there’s no time for something very exhaustive at first, you need to move quickly. If we are promoting a campaign we can know right away if it’s working or not. I can find out easily without having to take in the full volume of the conversation.”

With this kind of approach, where every member of the team can dedicate their full work time to what’s important, Jelly’s continuing success is no wonder. Check out their website to see what they are up to, and the type of results that can be produced by this kind of company.

Using Popular Hashtags To Grow Your Business

Do you use hashtags — catchy, attention-grabbing conversation anchors that people want to be associated with? If not, you can learn how here.


Hashtag 101– If you already know what hashtags are, skip this part and proceed to advanced hashtag uses below.

How hashtags work: When you use a #hashtag, you are adding your post to a list of all other posts that use this tag on that social platform.

For example, if you post a picture of your dog with #puppy in the caption or description, your post is now grouped with all other #puppy posts. Whenever someone searches #puppy on instagram for example, they will see all #puppy posts.

-puppy


Popular hashtags are a major deal. They engage social media users on a higher level.

No wonder Instagram images or videos with at least one hashtag generate 12.6% more engagement than posts without hashtags, and tweets with hashtags receive 2x more engagement than tweets without them.

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Image source

This doesn’t mean hashtags are an automatic ticket to social media success, but they can and do engage people by allowing them to become part of something larger than themselves.

Hashtags impart a sense of belonging — and encapsulate people’s beliefs, cultures, and professional brands. In an article on Salesforce, expert digital marketer Ann Smarty listed three hashtags that people follow for news on social: #twitternews, #socialmedianews and #socialmedia.

When people use or follow hashtags like these on social, they get to feel they’re a part of some huge; that’s the power of hashtags.

There are two main ways to use popular hashtags to grow your business:

  • Start your own branded hashtag and make it popular. Or…
  • Latch onto already popular unbranded hashtags and exploit them to grow your business. The three hashtags I mentioned from Ann Smarty are good examples of unbranded hashtags.

I’ll be sharing how to use these two different hashtag types to grow your business in this post.

Ready?

Let’s begin with unbranded hashtags.

These are usually popular hashtags that weren’t necessarily started by your brand.

They’re often industry hashtags like #marketing, event hashtags like #SXSW or day-related hashtags like #MusicMonday or #TuesdayInspiration. These are the basics. Tagging your posts with relevant industry, event and day-related hashtags will help you be a part of key conversations for your brand.

Here are three more advanced strategies for using unbranded hashtags to grow your business:

1. Look out for CTA (Call-to-Action) hashtags

Just as its name implies, CTA hashtags encourage people to take an action. Example: #BeYourOwnBoss or #StartABusiness.

These hashtags tend to work well because they encourage people to participate in something fun or rewarding — and everyone likes fun and rewards. More importantly, they persuade people to take an action on your tweets or posts.

You want to look for popular CTA hashtags that are related to your brand or product and engage prospects with them. These hashtags are especially rampant on Instagram and Twitter.

Example: Call-to-action hashtag #tagafriend skyrocketed Twitter engagement for Chocolate Picture:

Choc-pic-tweet

Of course, it wasn’t just the #tagafriend hashtag that drove this level of engagement for the brand. Chocolate Picture added some other hashtags and, perhaps more importantly, asked tweeters to follow and RT to get a chance to win the contest promoted in the tweet, which contributed to the success of the tweet. (Note: while hashtag functions are available on most platforms, they are particularly effective only on Twitter and Instagram)

The CTA hashtag #tagafriend, however, encouraged people to take an action — tag their friends.

-tagafriend-tweets

Plus, the CTA hashtag exposed the tweet to an audience that follows the #tagafriend hashtag and who may not have heard about Chocolate Picture before.

2. Twitter trending keywords and hashtags

Twitter gets over 300 million users per month, and the platform has a section called Trending. On a smartphone, Twitter Trending can be found once you click the search tab in your Twitter app. And it’s either on the left or right side of your desktop screen.

twitter-trends

These keywords and hashtags represent what people are talking about at any given time on the platform. You can see how this easily creates an opportunity for you to chip in your tweets on the matter discussed, and expose your brand to a new audience.

How you chime into these trending conversations, however, can make or break engagement for your tweet. Your tweet needs to be timely and relevant to the topic being discussed. Any irrelevant or untimely tweets will be ignored by tweeters and get buried under other tweets.

This doesn’t mean you can’t participate in conversations outside your industry; you can, but you need to ensure it’s relevant to the topic being discussed.

Example: when #FashionWeek was trending, sometime in 2013, cookie brand Oreo sent out a tweet with the hashtag:

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Image source

Oreo has nothing to do with fashion or Fashion Week; they’re clearly not a clothing brand, but they promoted their brand using the hashtag while making sure it’s related to the topic being discussed. Pretty clever.

Remember, Twitter trending tweets can stop trending at any time — they might be popular anywhere between minutes to a few days. You want your entry into trending conversations to be relevant and timely.

Another classic example is how duo music band Facing West took advantage of #MusicMonday on Twitter. The band used the hashtag to promote their new song on a Monday — March 5 — when the hashtag was trending:

Facing-West

This exposed their brand and music to a new audience and enthusiasts who follow the hashtag.

Twitter users use the Twitter Trending to stay abreast of what’s hot right now. They want to be in the know and not the last person to hear about some hot news. Do your brand a huge favor by chiming in on trending conversations and taking advantage of the lively engagement there.

3. Popular niche hashtags

Hashtags are crazier on Instagram than they are on Twitter, or any other social platform for that matter.

“…consider using popular hashtags like #tbt (throwback Thursdays) or #instagood (a showcase of a user’s best photos) to attract new followers. — Bryan Kramer

Using more than two hashtags on Twitter can make your engagement rate plummet. But on Instagram, the more hashtags, the merrier your engagement.

Head of Social Strategy at Canva, Peg Fitzpatrick, recommends adding your hashtags in multiple comments under each Instagram post:

You can use up to thirty hashtags on each post. I’d recommend sticking to three or four in the comments and then adding more into a comment below. It seems strange, but this is acceptable on Instagram.

If you want to use eleven hashtags in total per post, that works best on Instagram.

Enter niche hashtags. These hashtags are often used by people who are not just in your industry, but are in the same niche with you.

For example, #foodstagram is used by everyone and every business in the food/restaurant industry on Instagram. But a niche hashtag in the same food industry would be narrower. Take #foodblogger; the hashtag is apparently used by food bloggers on the platform, not every Tom, Dick, and Harry in the industry:

-foodblogger--2-

Instagrammers who are interested in seeing pictures from food bloggers — but not restaurants or random food lovers — they’ll use the #Foodblogger hashtag to narrow down their search that finds just the food bloggers they’re looking for.

Your industry hashtags are often used by everyone in the industry, so they naturally get more impressions than niche hashtags. But you want to use niche hashtags to engage with your own target customers.

To see what hashtags are relevant to your specific industry of brand, tools like Keyhole can be very helpful. You can insert a trending #hashtag or keyword into our tracker, and the Word Cloud feature within the main dashboard will show you what other hashtags or Keywords people are using along with it.

For instance, our WordCloud shows that when using #foodblogger, people also use these hashtags:

word-cloud

Now, branded hashtags.

These are hashtags started by your company. You know, the one you can lay a 100% claim to and enjoy all the benefits.

Branded hashtags don’t have to have your brand name in them, even though they sound like they should. But they should be related to your product or campaign name — so customers can link the hashtag to your business ultimately.

And if done right, they can become very popular hashtags that will take your brand to a higher level. Here are three strategies for growing a business with branded hashtags.

1. Require customers to use your brand hashtag to qualify for entry to promos and contests

This is one of the most common hashtag marketing strategies out there. You start a contest and require target customers to use your hashtags in their posts to qualify for the contest.

It’s like you’re starting a party and you’re asking everyone to come and eat. Everyone loves free food and drinks, right? That’s the idea.

Where it gets a little difficult is coming up with the perfect hashtag that people can relate to your business. One of the most successful branded hashtag so far is #ShareACoke — though, it wasn’t exactly a contest as we’re discussing here.

-shareacoke-ig

Three things make this hashtag awesome:

  • The hashtag is simple, which makes it memorable.
  • It clearly flaunts the brand’s name.
  • It’s a call-to-action (CTA) hashtag — as it encourages people to take an “fun” action, share a coke.

You can learn from this and make an effective and memorable hashtag for your business. Make it reflect your brand name clearly, make it simple and make it a CTA — you know, like #DoSomethingFun.

To get even more juice from this, you can ask contest participants to tag your business handle in their entries.

This may reduce the amount of people participating in your contest since you’ll be stressing them more by asking them to do more tasks. But you’ll be getting more bang from your investment — 54% of users surveyed by Twitter reported that they had taken action after seeing a brand mentioned in Tweets (including visiting their website, searching for the brand, or retweeting content).

In plain English, you get more ROI when users tag your brand in their entries for your contest or promos.

2. Ask event attendees to share, using your hashtag before and during the event

If you’re organizing an event, you can create a hashtag and ask your event attendees to share the post on social using your event’s hashtag. Andy Crestodina of Orbit Media Studios says it’s best to announce your event hashatag right at the start of the event:

“Tell the audience about it before the opening keynote.”

This means that you must have planned this hashtag ahead of time — it should have been ready long before the event day. In fact, planning it out long before the D-day gives it greater chance for good publicity.

Before the popular Social Media Week starts in every country, the #SMMW18 hashtag always has enough time to get in the hands and consciousness of people. Perhaps that’s because the hashtag has been planned and publicized months or weeks before the event starts.

And it’s one of the main reasons why virtually all marketers in many countries don’t miss out when the event date finally hits.

event-hashtag
Image source

The beauty of this is that once multiple people start tweeting with your hashtag during an event, Twitter notices the spike for that hashtag and adds it to their Trending list — which exposes your hashtag to Twitter users who like hot news.

This means more people will be seeing your hashtagged posts. It can lead to a massive explosion and brand awareness for you. And you may also attract people who haven’t heard about you or your hashtag before. They can become curious as to who you are why you’re trending on their Twitter.

3. Get people to like your hashtagged tweets and posts

Social networks want to feed their users with the best content their platforms offer. And it’s the same for your business. You want your best content consistently visible for optimal customer engagement.

Google, Youtube, and most other platforms also operate in this way. They all have top posts in a category on their platforms so more users can find them. When your tweets or Instagram posts get significant engagement, they are ranked in the top sections of the platforms they’re on for the hashtag(s) they contain.

For example, if your your post on Instagram with #musicmonday gets healthy engagement, say 200 likes and 20 comments, it can get ranked on the top posts section of Instagram.

-musicmonday-ig

If you’re already a popular brand, your hashtagged posts will naturally get hundreds and thousands of Likes or Favs, retweets, and replies in no time. And this will move your posts to the top sections of social networks. And, to amplify your reach, you may use influencers.

But if your brand is not so popular yet, you need to go to a little more work. You especially need influencers who will spread the word about your brand and hashtag. Ask your network — existing followers, customers and friends — to Like your posts so they reach more people.

Conclusion

Popular hashtags are a big deal. They raise an entire village of brand advocates, like what’s happening with Coca-Cola’s #shareacoke today.

The drink company is still enjoying all the brand awareness and sales that come from the hashtag, as many of their customers are eager to take fancy pictures with a bottle of coke and share it on social using the hashtag. It’s the same for every other brand that has worked to create popular hashtags.

Businesses that latch on to unbranded hashtags they didn’t create themselves also enjoy some level of success as seen with the Oreo example above. In the end, whether you create your brand hashtag or latch on to unbranded hashtags you didn’t create, your business is bound to see an uptake in engagement and sales if you hit the right combination.

Take a chance and experiment with hashtags. Learn to capitalize on what’s trending and help your business by becoming part of the hashtag trend.

Keyhole Social LIstening Strategies to Grow your Business Social Media Analytics Twitter Analytics

5 Powerful Social Listening Strategies To Grow Your Business Faster In 2018

Of the 7.5 billion people in the world, 3.03 billion of them are active social media users.

Your customers are, obviously, among these users and they have conversations on social platforms every day. This creates an opportunity for you to listen to what they are saying and learn more about them.

And that’s basically what social listening is — monitoring what customers are saying on social.

But it wouldn’t make sense to just listen to what people are saying about you or your industry. If you’re a good listener, you are learning, and if you’re a good student, you apply what you know.

Koka Sexton of Slack once shared his journey with social media, where he explained how he sees social media as not just a platform to interact with people, but to build a pipeline of relevant customers to grow businesses.

I came across this idea of social networks. (…) At that point, the idea of leveraging social networks as a sales person was basically unheard of. My focus was optimizing that behavior. (…) I had the goal of building my pipeline and not building a brand or building a fan base.

It’s not enough to listen or even watch your fan base grow, you need to use what you’re listening to to grow your business.

What you need is a toolbox of the social listening strategies that can help you benefit from monitoring social interactions. How do you make the most of the conversations that happen about your brand and industry on social media?

Here are five social listening strategies to grow your business faster in 2018.

1. Send bottom-of-the-funnel customers to gated free trials, product pages or waiting lists

Like top-of-the-funnel buyers, bottom-of-the-funnel consumers are also always lurking around conversations about your industry, brand, or specific product.

These people have heard about your brand before.

And they’re ready to buy. They just need a few questions answered.

So they ask questions like “Is there a version that will include xyz feature coming soon?” OR “Can your product do this specific thing?” If you’re keeping tabs on conversations in your industry, you’ll be able to pull these prospects into the fold.

In 2017, top car brand Audi had a tweet where a prospective Audi buyer (Godwin) asked if they had any new upgrades on a couple of their cars.

Audi responded saying the feature is coming in 2018, and sent the buyer a link where he could sign up with them to get updated once it’s out.

Image of Audi's tweet to the buyer

Once the buyer clicks the link, Audi sends him to a well-designed landing page where he’s being welcomed as a lead. The car brand gets his info and gets the chance to alert him once his desired feature is out in the market.

Image of Audi Landing Page

This is one of the best social listening strategies I’ve seen anywhere.

And there’s one beautiful but quite hidden advantage here: 67% of Americans say they get at least some of their news on social media.

This means while Audi is responding to Godwin with a signup form to fill, there are probably other potential buyers around who have the same question Godwin asked and would sign up to get updates from Audi as well — via the same page Audi sent to Godwin.

This way, Audi is using social listening as a tactic to generate more leads for their new car upgrade coming in 2018.

Another example: Aaron Lee, Regional Manager at Agorapulse, recently tweeted that he was looking for a good web host for a new site. New web host provider, ChemiCloud, took the stage and introduced Aaron to their new hosting platform.

Image of Chemicloud Hosting tweeting to Aaron

It’s a powerful social listening strategy to monitor these industry interactions and earn the opportunity to convert bottom-of-the-funnel prospects into actual paying buyers.

And if, like Audi, you don’t already have the feature or exact product a potential buyer is asking for, have a well-designed page ready to convert the person into a lead — so you have the opportunity to draw them back to your business when it’s time.

2. Refer top-of-the-funnel customers to ungated content (or any other value)

In social conversations in your industry, top-of-the-funnel (TOFU) customers are also always lurking around.

There’s always someone hearing about your brand or product for the first time or just seeing conversations about your brand or industry. Unlike the customers represented in my #1 strategy above, these people aren’t ready to buy anything; they only want to learn more about the matter being discussed — your product, brand or industry.

You can refer these customers to a piece of content, a handy tool, or any value that answers their questions and get them ready to buy.

Should you gate content (or any value at all) for TOFU customers?

Audi, in the example above, sent ready-to-buy prospects right from social interactions to a gated page; should you do the same for top-of-the-funnel customers? Not quite.

Picture this for a moment: you go to Twitter and find a promoted tweet that interests you. The tweet is from a brand you’ve never seen or heard of before, promoting a product you don’t entirely understand. So you’re curious. You want to learn more about about what’s being promoted. You reply the tweet asking “How do I get started?”

To which the brand replies, “Go to [this url] to learn how to get started.”

Would you click or not? You probably would. After all, you’re the one looking for answers.

But on getting to the page, you find a form asking for your personal information. Would you give your information just to learn more about a product? You probably won’t. Especially when you’re just trying to see how to get started with a product.

If you were ready to get started, that’s a different case, you’d sign up. But gating a page that’ll teach you how to get started? Not ideal.

Landing page leader Instapage puts it this way:

“During the awareness stage, most prospects know very little about your brand and have yet to trust you. Removing the gate from content in this stage can improve your brand’s visibility and enhance your credibility with prospects. As prospects move down the marketing funnel and are more interested in your business, they will be more likely to be willing to fill out a form in order to gain access to content like ebooks and webinars.”

So it’s best to make your tool, content or any other value ungated for TOFU people who just want to “learn more”.

You’ll also notice in the example above that Audi included a link in their tweet for top-of-the-funnel buyers to get more information about their available product (car).

Image of Audi Tweeting their new A8 and linking to a signup

The link takes TOFU prospects to a page that provides them with useful and intriguing information about the car. They learn about the different features of the car, like its new automated driving feature and interaction intelligence.

Remember, these are top-of-the-funnel customers from Audi’s social listening efforts. The car brand could have just tweeted and let it end there. But no, they squeezed more juice from their social listening and moved interested buyers further in their purchase journeys.

3. Turn negative feedback into opportunities

Here comes the horrible bit of social listening.

If you weren’t paying attention to what’s being said about your brand on social media, you’d be safe — like a turtle with its head in the sand. But if you’re listening, you would have to come across people who are not so pleased with your brand or product — AKA unhappy customers.

The study I cited earlier says 67% of Americans get news from social media. You can imagine how many people are watching when unhappy customers say things like these:

Image of Keyhole’s Sentiment page
Want to listen to your brand social interactions this way? Try Keyhole.

But what you do after getting bad reviews is what matters the most.

Social media expert Kim Garst advises that

While you don’t have direct control over the reviews people leave, there are two ways you can indirectly improve them:(1) Listen to negative feedback and use it to improve your business, and (2) Encourage satisfied customers or clients to leave reviews. This will dilute the impact of any negative reviews you receive.

Much of the damage from negative feedbacks is salvageable. And, working with complaints can be an opportunity to prove you really care about customers. Since these conversations happen on social media, everyone gets to see how you handle critics — especially when you handle them timely.

Author of the bestselling book The New Community Rules: Marketing on the Social Web, Tamar Weinberg, mirrors the same idea about handling critics with finesse and timeliness:

For social customer experience, it’s important to speak to users where they are and when they need you. It’s not just about Facebook and Twitter complaints. It’s about complaints that arise anywhere, including your own website.

However, it can be overwhelming to take note of every single piece of negative feedback, but the trick is to find the public embarrassments your company can do something about and handle the situation with finesse and style that impresses onlookers.

For example, JetBlue got a tweet from a customer who was complaining about being on a flight that had a bad headphone jack and a malfunctioning TV.

Image of cutomer tweeting to JetBlue

JetBlue responded with what clearly looks like more than just an apology; they offered to compensate the customer with a $15 credit for the inconvenience (once she can confirm she’s the actual customer who had the experience).

Image of JetBlue’s reply

Again, the beautiful thing about this is that everybody is watching. CrazyEgg cofounder Hiten Shah puts it this way — “We all should remember the social in social media. Otherwise it would just be media. Social media on the whole is all about people.”

Enough said about negative feedback. What do you do with the positive news?

4. Retweet or repost positive feedback

When monitoring your social analytics, you’ll come across encouraging and energizing feedback about your brand or product. What do you do with that kind of tangible evidence? Just be glad you got a good note? No, repost them (or retweet if it’s Twitter). That’s one of the most effective social listening strategies you can utilize.

Retweeting or reposting your customers’ positive feedback is a great strategy because it reminds your followers of the awesomeness of what you’re selling, and it will likely interest new leads who happen to hear others raving about you. And customer content, like reviews and positive feedback, yields as much as a 133% higher conversion rate.

Money saving app Piggybank does a great job at this. They repost the positive reviews they get from Twitter right on their Instagram page.

Image of Sam Hart tweeting about 'Saving Violently' using Piggybank

And since consumers resonate more easily with reviews from fellow consumers than from ads sent out by brands, Piggybank’s happy customers see fit to testify to the customer review Piggybank posted…

Image of Sam Hart tweeting about 'Saving Violently' using Piggybank

And there are also bottom-of-the-funnel customers asking how to get started; here’s one:

Image of Piggybank linking signup

That said, you can’t possibly repost every single positive feedback — especially if you’re a huge business where your comments pile up in the hundreds and thousands.

But use the great ones. Using this as one of your core social listening strategies can put you on the good side of your customers and lead new folks into your funnel.

5. Use a social monitoring tool (with the right features)

After all’s said and done, one thing that can make or break your social listening strategy is your social listening or monitoring tool. It’s the single tool that your entire social listening strategy will be built on. Heck, there’s hardly any campaign you’ll run today successful without using some marketing technology.

A great social monitoring tool will:

  • Analyze the most engaging posts about your brand so you can leverage them.
  • Alert you when an influencer talks about you so you can leverage that too.
  • Tell you once a keyword or topic you’re tracking is being talked about on social.
  • Will have all these functionalities in one platform.

There are several tools out there. We recommend Keyhole. Are we biased because that’s our tool? Well, don’t take our word for it.

Renowned marketing guru Neil Patel says: “You don’t want to be the one that comes in late to the party after everyone’s already left and moved on to the next big thing. You’ll want to contribute when the topic is still hot so you can be a thought leader on the subject. You can easily accomplish that with a tool called Keyhole. This tool isn’t free, but it does a lot of things others can’t. And as a bonus, it’s extremely user-friendly. Can you guess how to get started? That’s right, sign up for (a free trial) account.”

Conclusion

Conversations will always go on in your industry, and when they do, you want to join in and take advantage of the chatter.

Whether people are holding conversations directly about your brand, your industry, or your competitors, information is passing between people at high speed. You simply have to keep listening and monitoring.

The social listening strategies above reap your company lots and lots of benefits. Be proactive and take advantage of the tools out there to be a good listener. Take notice and look lively. Your business will be one of the best because you did.

Keyhole How to Spark Brand Mentions on Social Media Analytics Hashtag Tracker

How To Spark Brand Mentions On Social Media

Brand mentions on social media can drive significant results for your business.

58% of consumers follow brands through social media. Imagine your brand getting mentioned by tens, hundreds, or even thousands of people. Or getting lots of replies from potential buyers to your social media posts. It’s possible.

People go to social media to talk about things that they find exciting, sad, or useful. You can have them talk about your brand if you know how to make that happen.

Here are five ways to explode your brand mentions on social media:

1. “Create a scene” during an industry event

Industry events are already popular, drawing large, attentive audiences. You can do something remarkable in the context of an event to expose your brand to a lot of relevant prospects.

Think of the industry event like a cube of sugar thrown onto the ground. Within minutes, the cube is covered with ants.

It’s the same with industry events. Although the exposure you get from them is short lived, you’re bound to have an impact on a few key players when you create a scene during the course of the event.

For example, Social Media Week is one powerful event in the digital marketing space, especially in the social media niche. TopRank created a list of 50 social media marketing influencers and featured Twitter Marketing Pro Madalyn Sklar in it — alongside 49 other influencers.

Sklar then shared the post on Twitter using the official Social Media Week hashtag, #SMMW18:

Image of Sklar appearing on Social Media Week

Her tweets would normally get one or two likes, retweets, or replies in 24 hours. But this one was quite different. Sklar got 23 likes, 3 tweets and 4 replies (or brand mentions) in three hours.

These aren’t very big numbers, but it’s a significant increase in relative average engagement.

TopRank had other featured influencers share the post on social media using #SMMW18. Social media guru and founder of Up My Influence Josh Elledge didn’t just tweet the post with the #SMMW18 hashtag, he pinned the tweet so it gets more exposure.

Josh-in-toprank-list

Imagine the buzz created when 50 industry influencers are tweeting about them using the hashtag while Social Media Week is going on.

It’s a good example of creating something remarkable around popular industry events. A list of 50 social media influencers publishing while Social Media Week is going on is a powerful strategy to build brand mentions for TopRank.

However, before capitalizing on any event hashtag, you want to be sure the event is big enough and its hashtag is popular enough to drive your much needed social media brand mentions. This is where social monitoring tools come in.

For example, using the Keyhole (disclosure: I’m working with this brand) social monitoring tool, you can see key data about Social Media Week’s hashtag and then judge whether the event hashtag is worth creating something big about, or not.

Image of setting up #smw2018 as a new tracker
Want to see the popularity of an industry event’s hahstag? Try Keyhole.

From this tracker, you’ll find that between February 23 and February 26, posts about #SMMW18 have reached over 6 million people on Twitter and Instagram.

Once you’ve seen the quality of the engagement an industry event has and it meets your needs for exposure, you can go ahead and create something exceptional using the event’s hashtag.

It’s a powerful way to drive brand mentions.

Another strategy to drive social media mentions using influencers. It’s a strategy most brands are using these days, but how do you ensure you’re doing it the right way? The key is to avoid using all types of influencers.

2. Avoid using too many influencers

For every $1 spent on influencer marketing, you get a $6.5 return. That’s quite a huge profit.

But, you don’t need all the possible influencers out there. While this may sound counter-intuitive, it can help increase your ROI and cut unnecessary costs.

Maybe you’ve seen stories and case studies of how influencers have helped your competitors (or any brand at all) grow, and then you feel you should get your hands on all the influencers you can think of. The more the influencers, the more your reach, right?

Well, not exactly.

You want to be sure you’re spending your advertising budget on influencers who actually have your target customers as followers. Social media marketing veteran Neal Schaffer mirrors the same idea

To begin, use listening tools and do keyword searches to learn who in your industry is talking about topics or products relevant to your business.

In a bid to use all the influencers you can get your hands on, you may end up using some who don’t have your target audience as followers.

Instead of spreading yourself thin in that way, cut back and work with just the influencers who can expose your brand to an audience hungry for your content or product. You will increase your ROI when you focus only on influencers who are followed by your target customer.

A baby-clothing brand, for instance, is better off using baby or mommy influencers, not a popular Instagram travel star or a pop singer.

A good example is how mommy blogger Laura (@bump.today) featured three baby-related brands in one post:

Image of tweet from bump.today

Goldfish, lili.lane and Little Blessing Co. are all brands selling baby products. Goldfish sells baby food, the shorts on the baby are from lili.lane and the top is from Little Blessing Co.

These brands are going to be seen by Laura’s followers who are mostly moms — the target customers of the brands mentioned.

Now, how do you find specific influencers who your target customers mostly follow? Truth is you can simply do a google search like [industry term] + [influencers] and you’ll find a lot of options.

But a better way is to hook up with influencers who already talk about your brand on social media. Or, consider working with influencers who talk about your industry — even if they’ve never said anything about you.

Again, you’ll need a good social media monitoring tool. Using Keyhole, for instance, I can find influencers already talking about a brand like Gucci by tracking their hashtag — #Gucci. I just need to go to the influencers tab and I’ll find them there:

Image of Keyhole’s list of users using the hashtag Gucci

Want to find relevant influencers for your business? Try Keyhole.

The tool shows me Twitter and Instagram users with thousands and millions of followers who are talking about Gucci. I could also sort for influencers with the highest engagement rates by clicking the AVG ENG tab:

Image of Keyhole's list of users using the hashtag Gucci sorted by engagement

So before doing a wild search on Google for relevant influencers to promote your brand, you could save time by employing the powerful search capabilities of a social monitoring tool.

Use it to see which influencers are already praising your product.

These people have more experience with your product, and if they’re so popular that they ignore influencer marketing deals, you’ll be able to get in touch with them fast.

3. Know where target customers post from

There are now more social networks out there than ever before — obviously. Therefore, it’s vital that you know which platforms your target customers use the most.

You can, of course, be “everywhere” if you want, but you would be better off focusing your advertising efforts on relevant social platforms that will drive more brand mentions and ROI than others.

So how do you find out where your target customers hang out the most? Again, you need a social monitoring tool to find this out.

Take Ralph Lauren, for instance. Most of the fashion brand’s customers and retailers use the #RalphLauren hashtag to post the products they buy from them.

If Ralph Lauren were your competitor, you could track which sites and which parts of the world mention their hashtag the most — using Keyhole:

Image of Top Sites and Location on Keyhole dashboard

The results show most of the hashtags come from Twitter, which means most of the brand’s customers would be found on Twitter. Instagram is next on the chart, then eBay and so on.

This way, you can focus on driving more brand conversations from Instagram since that’s where most of your target customers are.

4. Discover which days your target consumers are most active

Social media never sleeps, right? True.

When Americans are sleeping, Asians and folks from other continents are wide awake tweeting and posting on social platforms.

In a recent Forbes article, Hootsuite’s Founder Ryan Holmes says:

[There is] a growing realization among businesses that social media is the single most effective way to reach audiences, with teens with teens (i.e. tomorrow’s consumers) now spending up to nine hours a day on social platforms.

However, while social media platforms are always active, there are days your audience is more active than most other days.

If your target customers appear to be hyperactive (in a good way) on certain days, it could mean those are the days they’re not bombarded with their jobs, family, or school (if they’re students).

You want to take advantage of these days and engage them.

Statistics show that posting on social media on specific days improves results. Hubspot, for instance, found that tweeting on Wednesdays gets more engagement than other days.

Image of the top day to post

However, not every research or study is exactly right for your business. You should check when your target customers are most active. You can do that with any good social monitoring tool. When they’re most active is the best time for you to post.

If you’re tracking your own social media account (or a competitor’s) using Keyhole’s Account Tracker, you will be given optimal posting times for that account based on engagement, taking out all the guesswork.

For example, you can use Keyhole to find what days of the week that retail brand ASOS gets engagement the most on Twitter:

Image of Keyhole's post optimization
Want to see your competitor’s best engagement days on social? Try Keyhole.

If ASOS was your competitor, you can see the days their customers are engaging with their tweets the most, and days they got little to no likes, retweets or replies.

Of course, there’s nothing wrong with the Hubspot’s statistics I cited, but your business may be getting most of its engagement on other days of the week. You need to track and compare to the most effective with your outreach.

5. Exploit User Generated Content (UGC)

If you’re not familiar with the term, UGC is: content (reviews) on social media generated by customers about your product.

90% of shoppers say user-generated content (UGC) on the Internet influences their decisions to make a purchase. And here’s how the rate of that influence has grown in recent years — according to data from Reevoo:

Gif of using influence of UGC on customer purchases

People trust other people recommending products to them more than advertising that comes directly from the brand.

HubSpot’s CEO Brian Halligan advises businesses to think about how to create a earned media (AKA User Generated Content) strategy…

My encouragement to service providers would be to…think about “How do we create a modern, earned media strategy?” Because that’s what really works in social media – it’s more content creation on the earned media side.

And rightly so. Whose recommendation are you more likely to trust — the brand’s or the consumer’s? Chances are high you’ll go for the latter.

A customer saying something about you on social media can spark conversations that promote your business.

And then, surprise of surprises, you find yourself receiving orders from the friends of a customer who just tweeted or posted about your product on Facebook, Instagram, Snapchat.

But how do you get consumers to become advocates for your brand and say nice things about your business on social? There are several ways to go about this, a few of which include:

  • Contests: Ask customers to share your product with a specific hashtag, and they get the chance to win a prize.
  • Offer discounts: Encourage consumers to share your products with their friends and win discounts.
  • Fun hashtags: Consumers, especially millennials, naturally want to share new products they buy or love with their friends. Give them a happy-sounding hashtag to do this.

However, to make the most of UGC, you should consider sharing them on your timeline. That is, after customers post something about your brand, don’t just be happy you’re spoken well of, retweet or repost the UGC. This will improve your reach and will likely get you more brand mentions.

Wrap up

Brand mentions can drive huge results for your business. Afterall, more mentions naturally mean more popularity. And more popularity leads to better brand awareness and ultimately sales. Use the strategies above and you can drive social interactions about your brand or product like never before.

Featured Image by Jason Rosewell on Unsplash

Social LIstening Best practices for growing businesses Keyhole Social Media Analytics

Social Listening Best Practices For Growing Businesses

More than listening to what customers are saying about your brand or industry in the social sphere, this one question is important:

What do you do with what your customers and prospects say on social media?

Hearing what customers say on social media is one thing, but understanding how to use their conversations to your brand’s advantage is another.

500 million tweets are sent every day. That’s ~6,000 tweets per second.

Image of Twitter statistics

And that’s just Twitter.

A prospect could tweet something as simple as I need a black shoe right now and get the attention of seventy of her followers engaging with the post.

What would happen, if you as a shoe brand (for instance) chime into that conversation with a link to your black shoe — including a discount coupon?

Here are five social listening best practices that can make a huge difference in your business:

1. Pick a successful competitor to imitate

When you learn from people who are already doing well, you’re in essence skipping the mistakes they made before getting to where they are today. You can avoid most of mistakes they made.

On learning from competitors, PR expert Gini Dietrich says

Analyze your competitors’ marketing—see which efforts work well, and understand why stakeholders like them: What is their primary messaging? Why does or doesn’t it work? How do people respond to the company’s overtures online? Is word of mouth positive or negative? Why?

Businesses perform better at social listening when they ethically learn from competitors who are already doing it right.

Piecing together their strategy is like scoring a free cheatsheet. Visit their platforms to see how they’re doing their social media — responding to feedback, joining industry conversations, and so on .

Fashion company Topshop, for example, is a good brand to learn social listening from. And of course, there are several other brands out there that are awesome at this.

While many other fashion brands only only take advantage of world-renowned events like Valentine’s Day and Christmas, Topshop takes advantage of other smaller festivals or events — especially in entertainment and fashion space.

When conversations about #EEBAFTAs (the hashtag for British Academy Film Awards) were trending on Twitter, Topshop joined in.

Tweet of Topshop during the #EEBAFTAs

Remember, this is an event many other fashion brands don’t value as much as they do more popular events. Well, Topshop decided to participate in the conversation on Twitter and their engagement rate soared higher; one of their tweets (the tweet image above) with the hashtag became the most popular on their timeline.

Image of Twitter's post listed on Twitter with the highest engagement
Want to see your competitor’s best performing posts like this on social? Try Keyhole.

So, when looking for brands to learn your social listening strategy from, companies like Topshop are good examples to learn from. They look at other industry-related events that most of their competitors aren’t looking at and take advantage of them.

There are hundreds or even thousands of other brands you can learn from. Do your research on brands doing social listening well in your industry and see how you can learn from them.

But what if you step into a lively conversation and get a slap in the face? You need to know when to enter an ongoing conversation on social media.

2. Determine when to engage an ongoing conversation

Social media is built on conversations, and consumers want to be talked to, not sold to.

social media marketing guru Carlos Gil put it more succinctly

Talk to your audience, make conversation, build relationships. Consumers are people and they don’t want to be sold to, they want to be engaged so engage them.

But it’s not just getting into conversations with prospects that’s important, you also need to know when and when not to engage them.

Ever gotten into a conversation and then realized you shouldn’t have? Or maybe your timing was just off?

When to enter an ongoing conversation is crucial.

It determines whether or not you’ll be getting any benefits from your social listening efforts or not. It determines whether you’ll get bashed or praised for joining a conversation. Avoid regret. Pick and choose your times to engage.

A few examples of typical conversations and how to engage them

2a. Customer service queries

Customer service related queries require your immediate response.

Customers get angry all the time for different reasons, and you want to ensure they don’t stay angry. Or they need to ask questions before buying from you.

In any case, you want to respond to customer service requests fast.

Netflix is known for its superior online customer service. That is due in large part to a corporate culture that empowers employees to act quickly — Rebekah Radice, Founder at RadiantLA

78% of consumers have bailed on a transaction or not made an intended purchase because of a poor service experience.

2b. An ongoing conversation about a government policy

Trying to take advantage of a social media conversation about a government policy that hurts people is an example of a potentially bad time to enter a social media conversation (depending on your stance).

For instance, following a ban from the US president last year, people from Muslim-majority countries were banned from entering the US. Taxi companies weren’t happy about this, and so they all went down the JFK airport and stopped pickups from working.

Amidst this commotion, Uber saw it fit to join the conversation and advertise their service, in theory helping stranded passengers. The turn out was bad. #DeleteUber became a thing on the Internet with many users posting how they weren’t happy without Uber’s position on the ban:

Tweet of #DeleteUber
Image Source

And right now, people tweet multiple times per hour clamouring for the car driving service to be deleted:

Image of another #DeleteUber Tweet

If you’re not going to sympathize with people who find a particular policy disturbing, it’s best to stay away from conversations like this.

2c. When to keep quiet or simply apologize

Sometimes it’s best to remain silent — when saying anything at all will make a situation bad on all sides. Depending on the vitriol being spread, you may just want to pretend you didn’t hear a thing.

A smart rule of thumb is to only get involved in conversations when you know you won’t get burned or miss out on significant benefits.

For example, these conversation scenarios are clear enough to know whether or not to chime in:

  • An angry customer is egging people on and you feel you might be baited into a fight – Do not chime it.
  • You feel tempted to speak ill of a competitor’s product. – Do not chime in.
  • You feel tempted to market your Spring bouquets on Christmas Day (making you look like an extraterrestial)- Do not chime in.
  • You will literally miss the party if you don’t get into a conversation on time — like tweeting about Valentine’s Day on February 15 – Chime in!
  • You won’t get burned for marketing your Valentine’s products on Valentine’s Day – Chime in!

These are just a few examples. Think up a few you want to avoid or join.

But it’s still not always this straightforward, right?

Sometimes it can get really dicey and you won’t be sure whether or how to respond to feedback in the sometimes volatile social arena. Everybody’s watching, remember?

And bad news travels fast.

For example, one Clayburn Griffin mentioned Cap ‘n Crunch on Twitter, saying…

Tweet about Cap'n Crunch

It was quite an insult thrown at the cereal brand, but they kept quiet. While Cap ‘n Crunch were probably still nursing their bruise, their competitor (KFC) saw a potential win for their own marketing. So they replied the tweeter, calling Cap ‘n Crunch a has been.

What would you do in this situation? It rarely ever happens that competitors throw public insults at each other — so you have almost no case studies to learn from.

Well, Cap ‘n Crunch left Clayburn (the consumer) alone — customers are always right, right? — and gave KFC an outstanding clapback…

Cap 'n Crunch's tweet at KFC

Cap ‘n Crunch probably wasn’t sure what the outcome of their clapback would be. But they took the risk anyway. As it turned out, it worked for them. Cap ‘n Crunch’s tweet clearly got more love than KFC’s.

Should you do the same if you were in this situation?

Speaking about the reason for their clapback, Andrew Cunningham from Huge (which managed digital for Cap ‘n Crunch) said: “KFC came at us pretty hard, and at that point we had full license to zing them back.”

Sometimes it isn’t rocket science to know when to enter a conversation. Sometimes it is. A smart rule of thumb, however, would be to only respond to conversations that clearly CAN BE handled. And apologize when occasion demands.

Another good social listening practice is to have your social media team collaborate with relevant departments in your organization to provide accurate information.

3. Have relevant departments go all in

Social media is clearly not a secondary channel for marketing anymore, it’s the main channel today.

And if that’s the case, then it’s worth having all relevant departments in your organization collaborating on it.

When an issue is brought up by a customer that your social media team doesn’t have enough expertise to handle, have them link up with the relevant departments that can provide apt feedback or information.

78% of customers say competent service reps play a huge role in a happy customer experience.

Image of customer reps playing a huge role

Service reps can’t be competent if they aren’t fed the right information by relevant departments. So departments in your organization need to collaborate with your social listening efforts.

Customers hate it when they reach out to your customer service via social media and don’t get a satisfactory response. Or when you tell them to send an email to get an issued solved. Nothing beats you giving them the right response right from social media where they contacted you.

I have for 10 years—long before Facebook was even on the map—called myself a “relationship marketing specialist.” And I love that term because to me it transcends the medium. It’s all about people doing business with people. — Mari Smith, Top Facebook Marketing Expert.

And remember, it’s social media — everybody’s watching.

This doesn’t mean your programmers, finance people, and other staff need to abandon their roles all the time to respond to customer complaints on social. But they can play a huge role in assisting your social media managers with the relevant information they need.

An open communication line between the social media team and relevant departments can work wonders here.

That said, your entire social listening effort, however, is nothing without a good social monitoring tool.

4. Carefully consider your choice for a social media listening tool

Social media listening tools help you analyze what’s been said about your brand and industry on social media.

There are many social media monitoring tools out there, which makes choosing the right one a challenge sometimes. But you need to find the right one for your business anyway.

An inefficient social listening tool will make your social marketing efforts unnecessarily hard and frustrating.

If, for example, your tool can’t help you sort out the different sentiments in your social mentions, it’s going to be really hard to start scrolling through the many mentions you get to get the one(s) you’re looking for.

Image of Keyhole’s sentiment on posts with Tracker ASOS
Want to monitor your social media mentions like this? Try Keyhole.

Social conversation monitors have different capabilities. Some provide basic functions while others offer more advanced features. You want to pick the one that offers the functions that matter to your business.

5. In the end, how much is social listening doing for you?

You need to track metrics that matter. Otherwise, it’d be all for nothing. And there are lots of things to track, but you need to spot the ones that really matter to your business.

A few things to track:

  • Sentiment: How many mentions about your brand are favourable or otherwise.
  • Popularity: How many mentions are you getting per day, week or month?
  • Influencers: Who are the influencers talking about you, how many are they and what are they saying?
  • Most engaging topics: Which topics get the most likes, replies and reposts? Knowing this will help you understand where to focus your social listening efforts.

Conclusion

What you do with what you’re hearing about your brand is critical in this age where it feels like social media is controlling the world. Use the strategies in this piece to make the most of what’s being said about you and your industry.

Keyhole Social Media Listening Academic Research Insights

University of Idaho Professor Uses Keyhole to Gather Live Info on a “Huge Scale”

blevins-header-1

Now let me tell you about Dr. Blevins’s research.

We all remember the Women’s March of 2017. It was one of the largest demonstrations in US history, with millions of people marching in the US alone, and hundreds of other marches happening around the world.

It quickly became a source of interest for many. How did a movement with no defined goal or governing body make such an impact, mobilizing millions? This is what Dr. Blevins sets out to answer in her paper “The Women’s Convention: Reclaiming a Movement”.

Image of a Women's March

In it, she explores how the Women’s March movement was able to gather much-needed resources through social media, ultimately allowing it to scale to the Women’s Convention of 2017.

Using Keyhole, Dr. Blevins analyzed the posts being made by the Women’s March Facebook page, noting what posts were being shared with the intention of gathering resources for the convention.

Image of Keyhole tracking the Women's March Facebook

She also tracked the overall impact of #WomensConvention on Twitter and Instagram, analyzing overall reach and impressions.

Image of Keyhole tracking #WomensConvention

As she shares within her paper:

“During the same two month spread that this paper focused on for official posts from the Women’s March Facebook page, there were 85,867 posts tagged with the #WomensConvention hashtag. Those user posts had a reach of 142 million unique users, and made over 456 million impressions.

Those metrics are almost impossible to manage using traditional media tactics, especially for decentralized, activist organizations and movements.” (Blevins, “The Women’s Convention: Reclaiming a Movement”)

She shares with us that many researchers are not yet using tools like Keyhole to gather data in this way, but this is a change we will likely start to see in the future.

“A lot of social media researchers gather data manually. Mostly because most of us come from a social science background and we’re not used to being able to use a lot of software. This idea of being able to gather live info on a huge scale is something we are not used to.”

For Dr. Blevins, however, using Keyhole has proven to exponentially increase the amount of data gathered. She also shared with us that our historical offering was particularly useful, especially “at a price point that an academic can afford” (historical offering= gathering old posts that were shared on social).

“The ability to gather data like that is something I’ve never seen before. Being able to actually see that data with discourse and seeing attitude [Sentiment] is really unique. I really appreciate that as a researcher. From a couple of months of using Keyhole I have enough research and raw data that I could get sufficient publications written to get tenure.”

Overall, working with Dr. Blevins has helped us understand how Keyhole can be successfully applied as a research tool, an exciting use that we can’t wait to see more of.

As Dr Blevins shares,

“While this software is usually used by advertisers as part of their in-depth social-media analytics, it holds valuable insights for social media research as well” (Blevins, “The Women’s Convention: Reclaiming a Movement”).

Keyhole Social Media AnalBottleRock

How BottleRock Music Festival Amps Up Influencer Engagement with Keyhole

BottleRock is a Napa Valley music festival that aims to bring together the best of Napa culture- wine, music, food and more wine, in true Napa fashion.

At BottleRock - two hands holding wine glasses

“When people come to Napa, the first thing that they think of is great wine. What goes along with great wine is great food, and what pairs perfectly with food and wine is music. Add beautiful rolling hills, vineyards, and world-class hospitality and you have what we call BottleRock Napa Valley.”

-Jasa Laliberte, Marketing Manager.
Jasa-Headshot

The festival was originally started in 2013, and by 2015 was selling out. This year, with an impressive lineup, festival tickets sold out earlier than ever before.

Image of a Bottlerock Concert Performance

“We really focus a lot on customer experience, paying particular emphasis to our 4 different levels of VIP and providing an all-around amazing experience for the concert-goer from start to finish. In the same way that Napa provides such amazing hospitality, we try to do the same thing at our festival.”

Why Keyhole

The marketing team at BottleRock accomplishes some pretty awesome feats through our tool year-round. Check it out! They include:

Finding Influencers

Image of the Cocktails Fans Platinum Lounge at BottleRock

Jasa’s team is able to regularly find and engage artists and influencers they didn’t know were speaking about BottleRock through Keyhole’s Influencers* tab.

*Tell me more: The ‘Influencers’ tab in Keyhole shows top users engaging with your hashtag or keyword, allowing you to engage with them and their content directly from the platform.

“Before Keyhole, I wasn’t seeing some of the bigger accounts that were talking about us. I just never knew they were out there being a positive influencer for us! So now I’m definitely looking into those people. We have kind of a daily ‘a-ha!’ moment with Keyhole.”

Identifying Trends by Tracking Hashtags Year-Round

According to Jasa, Keyhole’s biggest impact is saving time by clearly depicting cross-platform data.

We asked Jasa what she did before Keyhole, to which she laughingly replied, “Well, I had lots of spreadsheets!”

“The biggest thing that’s been helpful for us is being able to actually see our overall impressions online. The data was on different platforms and we were not able to see what other people were saying about us very easily. Now we are actually able to put a number and a statistic behind it.”

By tracking relevant hashtags and keywords year-round, Jasa’s team is also able to identify relevant trends as they happen, and adjust their strategies and event accordingly.

via GIPHY

“The biggest things are the analytics behind it, the numbers. We’ve tracked hashtags for the last 5 years, but we’ve never done it all year round–so it’s been beneficial for us to see different trends and quantify them.”

Optimizing content

Lastly, Keyhole helps with content creation by giving insight into the types of conversations users are having.

Keyhole’s word cloud for the ‘Napa’ Keyword tracker shows what else people discuss when talking about Napa online.
Image of Keyhole's Related Topics word cloud

“It is influencing our strategy. As we are moving to figure out specific copy and content, we are looking at what we’re putting out there in terms of hashtags and keywords, and figuring out what themes and trends we are seeing…what is being engaged with the most. We try and find that theme and replicate it.”

Results

Overall, Keyhole’s data has helped BottleRock’s marketing team save time and simplify their processes, allowing them to focus on what’s most important: creating unforgettable festival experiences and selling out year after year.

What can Keyhole do for you? Sign up for a 3-day free trial and find out!

Feature-Stories-Keyhole-Customer-Success-Hero-Stories-Influencers-Social-listening-easy-reporting World Elephant Day

How #WorldElephantDay Uses Keyhole to Help Find Investors

“Media plays an impact, we had 1.6 billion impressions on #WorldElephantDay. Now, we have to find a way to turn that engagement into funding and sponsorship so that it can continue to help the elephants”.

Every August 12th, the world gets together to save elephants for #WorldElephantDay. The annual awareness campaign, which began in 2012, was created by documentary filmmaker Patricia Sims and her colleagues.

“When I started to learn about elephants, their intelligence and their emotional capabilities, I learned also about how complex some of the issues that affect them are, and decided it was important to bring the world together on finding solutions. That’s what inspired me to create World Elephant Day,” shares Patricia.

Today, Patricia continues to lead this annual campaign as the Co-Founder and Executive Director of the World Elephant Society, a nonprofit tax-exempt 501(c)(3) charity organization that supports World Elephant Day as well as its website and related events.

WED-image of Patricia

Patricia amplifies World Elephant Day through Keyhole year-round by a) finding and connecting with influencers and b) easily collecting campaign data to help secure investors and sponsoring partners.

Influencers: As the campaign has gained traction over the years, it has become globally recognized in the elephant conservation movement. Patricia shares that, as a result, influencers and organizations often use the campaign’s hashtag year round in connection to other elephant conservation movements, sponsoring programmes, and more.

By using Keyhole, Patricia and her team are able to easily identify top influencers engaging with their hashtag, and directly reach out to them to amplify their message.

“Influencers have really helped us with growth- when you can target them specifically, it can help get your message out so much more effectively,” tells us Patricia.

Data for Investors: Patricia’s team works with Keyhole to help identify campaign reach, engagement, and growth, easily organizing all this data and helping Patricia present it to potential collaborators and sponsors.

“With the data collected using Keyhole I turn engagement into action, drafting reports for potential partnerships and funders that demonstrate our growth, reach, and impact.”

Result

Keyhole has helped World Elephant Day get more value out of its social media presence.

In 2018, Patricia and her team will use this data to create a more formal brand strategy, taking advantage of the large brand impact her campaign has in the conservation space to attract sponsors and partners to support the World Elephant Day campaign and her organization year-round.

WED-image of Elephants
*All images courtesy of World Elephant Society

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